TheraTears® Drops are back!

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After a long break we now have TheraTears® Eye Drops back on our shelf. The options for dry eye drops can seem overwhelming, but we have found TheraTears® Eye Drops have a loyal following. Our TheraTears® users have had to use other drops for the last while, but most are switching back again. 

Successful products are often developed by someone trying to find a new solution. In this case it was a young medical student at Columbia University.  Dr Jeffery Gilbard was astonished by the lack of dry eye treatments available in 1976. He was the youngest scientist in history to receive project grant funding from the National Eye Institute, and his summer research project turned into one of the most productive dry eye research programs in the world.

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Dr. Gilbard’s research program had one goal: to develop a profound understanding of dry eye and a treatment that could offer true relief. After completing his ophthalmology residency at Harvard Medical School in the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Dr Gilbard remained as a Head Fellow in Cornea. 

His light-bulb moment came in the form of a question: “Why do the living cells on the eye surface need a tear film–and what do they need from the tear supply?” The answer: oxygen and electrolytes. Supplying oxygen and electrolytes restores the eye’s natural balance, called Osmo-Correction® (read more about Dry Eye). This discovery led to TheraTears® Eye Drops.

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How fortunate we are today to benefit from his research and being able to use these drops.     

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We have been sending TheraTears®  Eye Drops sister product TheraTears® Eye Nutrition Capsules around the country, through our online shop, this may offer a more convenient option for you.

 

 

Stem Cells Restore Sight to Macular Degeneration Patients

Patients with wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD) received a new treatment derived from stem cells and have regained reading vision. 
The study is a major milestone for the London Project to Cure Blindness (a partnership between Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, the UCL Institute of Ophthalmology and the National Institute for Health Research). Professor Pete Coffey from UCL said the research may lead to “an affordable 'off-the-shelf' therapy… within the next five years”. However, Macular Degeneration New Zealand, and Macular Disease Foundation Australia have advised caution, more work is needed before this can occur. 

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